Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Duke University MasterCard Foundation Scholarships for African Students 2018/2019 – USA

Duke University, USA in Partnership with MasterCard Foundation Scholars Programme is offering Undergraduate Scholarships to Students from Sub-Saharan Africa 2018

Application Deadline: Ongoing

Offered Annually? Yes

Eligible Countries: Sub-Saharan African countries

To be taken at (country): Duke University, USA

Eligible Fields of Study: Courses offered at the university.

About the Award: The MasterCard Foundation Scholars at Duke University represent the intellect and energy of the youth of Sub-Saharan Africa. With a financial commitment of $13.5 million from The MasterCard Foundation, Duke will educate seven classes of five students — a total of 35 students — over the next 10 years.

The Duke University class of 2016, 2017 and 2018 include 15 of these outstanding scholars selected not only for their academic capabilities, but also for their desire to become change agents in Africa. The MasterCard Foundation Scholars studying at Duke University are from South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mauritius, and Zimbabwe.

duke university mastercard foundation scholars

One of Duke’s great advantages for The MasterCard Foundation Scholars is the network of resources the university provides to scholars, their families, and students who are interested in the program.

Offered Since: 2012

Type: Undergraduate

Selection Criteria and Eligibility: The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program at Duke is open to students from sub-Saharan Africa who demonstrate financial need, academic ability and merit, and demonstrated commitment to improving the lives of others in their communities.

Students apply to Duke first, and are then considered for The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program.

Number of Scholarships: 5 each year

Value of Scholarship: Full scholarship and mentorship program

Duration of Scholarship: Full period of study

How to Apply: By simply applying to Duke University all students from Africa will be considered for The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program based on academic talent, financial need, and interest in improving their communities.

Visit scholarship webpage for details

Sponsors: MasterCard Foundation

6 Comments
  1. Anna John says

    Am Luis Joyce from Canada I have tried dozens of love spells and had no success. I was online and came across Dr ALABI Spells. I was having an issue with my partner we have both been separated for 3 months. I thought I would try one more time. I was told that my case would be done in so little time. I must admit I was a bit skeptical with my past experiences and all. Dr ALABI said your problems are solved my child However a day later after casting the spell here I am back together with my partner and we are doing better then ever.If it was not for.{[email protected] } I do not know how I would be able to cope with life any longer.i will also advice for any one in such or similar problems or any kind of problems should also contact him via email{ [email protected]} for help Good bye.

  2. Adijat Olayemi Rahmon says

    I was one of those kids who always wanted to be doctor. I didn’t understand the responsibilities and heartbreaks, the difficult decisions, and the years of study and training that go with the title, but I did understand that the person in the white coat stood for knowledge, professionalism, and compassion. As a child, visits to the pediatrician were important events. I’d attend to my hair and clothes, and travel to the appointment in anticipation. I loved the interaction with my doctor. I loved that whoever I was in the larger world, I could enter the safe space of the doctor’s office, and for a moment my concerns were heard and evaluated. I listened as my mother communicated with the doctor. I’d be asked questions, respectfully examined, treatments and options would be weighed, and we would be on our way. My mother had been supported in her efforts to raise a well child, and I’d had a meaningful interaction with an adult who cared for my body and development. I understood medicine as an act of service, which aligned with my values, and became a dream.

    I was hospitalized for several months as a teenager and was inspired by the experience, despite the illness. In the time of diagnosis, treatment and recovery, I met truly sick children. Children who were much more ill than me. Children who wouldn’t recover. We shared a four-bed room, and we shared our medical stories. Because of the old hospital building, there was little privacy in our room, and we couldn’t help but listen-in during rounds, learning the medical details, becoming “experts” in our four distinct cases. I had more mobility than some of the patients, and when the medical team and family members were unavailable, I’d run simple errands for my roommates, liaise informally with staff, and attend to needs. To bring physical relief, a cold compress, a warmed blanket, a message to a nurse, filled me with such an intense joy and sense of purpose that I applied for a volunteer position at the hospital during my industrial training in 400 level at OJO PUBLIC HEALTH CENTER while studying chemistry .

    I have since been volunteering in emergency departments, out-patient clinics, and long term care facilities. While the depth of human suffering is at times shocking and the iterations of illness astounding, it is in the long-term care facility that I had the most meaningful experiences by virtue of my responsibilities and the nature of the patients’ illnesses. Charles was 55 when he died. He had early onset Parkinson’s Disease with dementia that revealed itself with a small tremor when he was in his late twenties. Charles had a wife and three daughters who visited regularly, but whom he didn’t often remember. Over four years as a volunteer, my role with the family was to fill in the spaces left by Charles’ periodic inability to project his voice as well as his growing cognitive lapses. I would tell the family of his activities between their visits, and I would remind him of their visits and their news. This was a hard experience for me. I watched as 3 daughters, around my own age, incrementally lost their father. I became angry, and then I grew even more determined.

    In the summer of 4th year of my Health Sciences degree, I was chosen to participate in an undergraduate research fellowship in biomedical research at my university. As part of this experience, I worked alongside graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, medical students, physicians.We collaborated in teams, and by way of the principal investigator’s careful leadership, I learned wherever one falls in terms of rank, each contribution is vital to the outcome. None of the work is in isolation. For instance, I was closely mentored by Will, a graduate student who had been in my role the previous summer. He, in turn, collaborated with post docs and medical students, turning to faculty when roadblocks were met. While one person’s knowledge and skill may be deeper than another’s, individual efforts make up the whole. Working in this team, aside from developing research skills, I realized that practicing medicine is not an individual pursuit, but a collaborative commitment to excellence in scholarship and leadership, which all begins with mentorship.

    Building on this experience with teamwork in the lab, I participated in a global health initiative in Epe general hospital, Lagos for four months, where I worked alongside nurses, doctors, and translators. I worked in mobile rural health camps that offered tuberculosis care, monitored the health and development of babies and children under 5, and tended to minor injuries. We worked 11-hour days helping hundreds of people in the 3 days we spent in each location. Patients would already be in line before we woke each morning. I spent each day recording basic demographic information, blood pressure, pulse, temperature, weight, height, as well as random blood sugar levels, for each patient, before they lined up to see a doctor. Each day was exhausting and satisfying. We helped so many people. But this satisfaction was quickly displaced by a developing understanding of issues in health equity.

  3. James B. Roberts says

    I want to apply for the Duke University MasterCard Foundation Scholarships for African Students 2018/2019 – USA
    How can I?

  4. Precious chihwehwete says

    I want to apply for Duke university MasterCard foundation scholarship for African students

  5. Frank says

    I need to apply

  6. Ernest Antwi says

    i want to apply for Duku University Mastercard Foundation Schoarship for African Students
    How can i

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.